TABB Forum

US Congressman Patrick McHenry recently sent a letter to Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen criticising the Fed’s participation in setting global banking rules of conduct and asserting that standards are agreed in opaque settings. But standardisation lowers business costs in finance as in manufacturing – for American banks and investors as well as their international counterparts. A common set of rules for the global financial industry is just a matter of common sense, argues Thomas Murray.

On 28 November 2016, we managers at Thomas Murray were concerned to see the publication of:

COM(2016) 856 final 2016/0365 (COD)

Proposal for a REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL on a framework for the recovery and resolution of central counterparties and amending Regulations (EU) No 1095/2010, (EU) No 648/2012, and (EU) 2015/2365

We understand that this is a first legislative draft, and write in the hope that it will be very significantly amended.

The role of exchanges has changed, and they may no longer be ‘national treasures.’ But what exactly, then, is an exchange these days? And have other capital markets actors picked up what used to be the hallmark quality standards that brought a degree of confidence to the market?

A listed exchange is a public company and a national treasure, a dual identity to be embraced. Can the Deutsche Boerse - London Stock Exchange deal succeed in the corporate sense and also in the fulfilment of exchanges’ obligations to the public good? History has demonstrated that building cross-border securities exchanges is not only hard, but it has the propensity to fail.