News & Opinion

Today marks an exciting development at Thomas Murray IDS Australia and New Zealand, as we announce the Australian release of our multi-purpose software tool SupplierSelect for Financial Services (SupplierSelect). SupplierSelect is suitable for Australian Superannuation Funds with in-house investment teams and will help them appoint, monitor, and manage financial services providers. It is designed for business leaders as it provides audited transparent decision making.

My colleagues and I have been uniquely privileged to see a wide range of Fund operational challenges on a regular basis. One that is very familiar to us is an Institutional investor making major procurement decisions or monitoring key service providers with the use of an in-house spreadsheet. The administrative challenges of drafting, issuing, re-issuing, and scoring complex due diligence questionnaires and policy reviews can be formidable.

Agreed and launched in 2012, the CPMI-IOSCO Principles for Financial Market Infrastructures (‘PFMIs’) require that all central securities depositories (CSDs), central clearing houses (CCPs), payment systems, and trade repositories perform a very detailed self-assessment of how well they observe these global standards. The self-assessments are meant to be published as a matter of enforcing transparency on these systemically critical systems, and also to reassure the markets and public that these national institutions are meeting a consistent set of minimum standards. The PFMIs are one set of the body of standards orchestrated by the Financial Stability Board on behalf of G20 governments.

Quite rightly, there are veritable storms in capital markets conferences and the press about what needs to be done to prepare for MiFID II, due to take effect in 4+ months. There seems to be little chance for a further stay of execution, but then, with remarkable irony, MiFID I hit securities trading in November 2007 as the Global Financial Crisis was deepening, leading to the most massive destruction of capital in decades, and so undermining large swathes of the world economy. Regulators cannot time such matters, and the preparation of reforms based on broad public consultations and multiple drafts takes years. Still, we are where we are: perhaps some sort of progressive implementation would be sensible. If the authorities are certain of the value of their objectives, then surely it would be worth demonstrating some flexibility.

This is the second in a series of articles on PMFIs.

In response to the Global Financial Crisis of 2007-2009, the G20 countries developed a series of public policy initiatives in order to reorder and de-risk the world’s financial system. As initially announced in the 2009 Pittsburgh Declaration by the heads of those 20 governments, a key element focused on solidifying market infrastructures, themselves a central focus of Thomas Murray’s work since the company’s founding in 1994.

Earlier this month, Euroclear UK & Ireland (EUI) issued a consultation to participants concerning their proposals to enhance the US dollar settlement arrangements in the CREST system, and make relevant changes to CREST documentation. Thomas Murray wholeheartedly supports these proposals.

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